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Letters: Hyped claims of fallout from tax reform

Contributed To The Press • Jan 26, 2018 at 12:00 AM

Hyper-partisan congressmen like Phil Roe are compelled to only tell part of the truth, the parts that support their narrative. In Roe’s Jan. 6 email newsletter, he hypes the unpopular tax bill by crowing about one-time bonuses dramatically announced by some large corporations which they attributed to tax cuts. That part’s all true. What Roe omits is that many of them are responding to being under the gun of government scrutiny.

Bank of America and Wells Fargo are under pressure to be agreeable with Trump because of unresolved investigations into the mortgage-bond crisis with billions in penalties yet to be determined. Wells Fargo faces more serious fallout from its fake accounts scandal.

AT&T’s coveted merger with Time Warner has so far been held subject to delay by the Justice Department. Comcast, an enemy of net neutrality, which around 85 percent of Americans demand, needs the FCC to help it fight the public. Boeing really, really wants to keep its contract for the new Air Force One jet which Trump has threatened to award elsewhere.

You get the point. Announcing these bonuses are motivated to curry favor with an easily influenced president (and Republicans) desperate for something to crow about. One-time bonuses, regardless of motivation, may actually impress Roe, but they shouldn’t. They are a drop in the bucket for corporations set to reap billions from tax cuts.

AT&T already said it will use its billions for stock buybacks, as will the others. How do a few millions in one-time bonuses compare to that?

Only pay raises, including a hike to the minimum wage, will have substantial long-term economic benefit. 

MARION GROVER

Johnson City

Bump-fire stocks

This is my reply to your Question of the Week about pending legislation filed by state Sen. Lee Harris and state Rep. Dwayne Thompson concerning the regulation of “bump-fire stocks” in Tennessee.

To begin with, a semiautomatic firearm has a maximum rate-of-fire equal to one shot per trigger pull. The so-called bump stocks do not change this fact. The bump stock cannot increase the rate of fire of any semiautomatic firearm because the action of the firearm can never exceed the maximum speed of its internal mechanical devices. To suggest otherwise is a fallacy that is easily disproven.

In short, Harris and Thompson might as well attempt to regulate how quickly a man can move his finger to make successive shots.

J. ROBERT FORBUS

Greenbrier

Two more years?

Term limits. Are they good or bad? The answer from 1st District Rep. Phil Roe might depend on when you ask. Back when he first ran against one-term incumbent David Davis, he said term limits are good. Seems now he that he has learned the ropes, Roe feels he is indispensable — even in a district that has been held by a Republican for over 100 years. What does this say about Dr. Roe?

After eight years as a total obstructionist to the Obama administration he thinks he deserves at least two more years to rubber stamp anything Donald Trump does? I don’t think so.

SARA LANE

Watauga

Our Dreamers

The news lately has been about Dreamers, well I have a question: What about the American Dreamers? They also have dreams and some of them don’t have food to eat or heat in their schools or homes, They also have dreams of a better life,

Why should we put others before our own children? Please tell me why we should take food from their mouths to give to someone who is not American? When are we as a country going to wake up? After we take care of our own Dreamers, then and only then do we help them.

And, yes, we do need the wall because in 10 or 15 years from now we will be right back here talking about this same issue. On another topic, look at all the companies that are giving their employes bonuses, which Nancy Pelosi said was crumbs. What world does she live in?

CHARLES G. WOODS

Roan Mountain 

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